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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
opposed, but today house speaker john boehner seemed to suggest he was open to wiggle room on the issue of taxes or fresh revenues. on the other hand, democrats are willing to compromise on sacred cows, entitlement reform. let's hear more of what the congressional leaders had to say after the meeting. take a listen. >> we should have a goal in terms of how much deficit reduction. we should have a deadline before christmas. we should share some milestones of success so that confidence can build. >> we have the cornerstones of being able to work something out. we're both going to give up some of the things that we know are a problem. >> we're prepared to put revenue on the table, provided we fix the real problem. >> reporter: tamron, if they can't avoid going over the fiscal cliff, it could mean economic disaster and the economy slips back into recession. i think we have a graphic of what that would specifically look like. the unemployment rate could tick back up to 9.1%, more than 3 million jobs could be lost. it could be a tax hike of $2,000 to middle income families. i spoke with some
're digging their heels in. instead we saw joshing around the table about john boehner's birthday between the president and john boehner. is it any different, or is this just about, i don't know, smoke and mirrors? >> well, i think the atmosphere is certainly different as you mentioned. in the past, these guys would go back to capitol hill and put out competing statements about what went on during the meetings. you saw what happened last year during the debt ceiling negotiations. this time it was one big happy family. there certainly seems to be some sort of recognition on the part of how fed up american people with sort of the seeing this game of chicken being played at such a high stakes time. i think there is certainly, after this election, there is kind of a let's get down to business. let's see if we can get this thing done. whether that can translate -- david just said, the biggest sticking point, taxes on the wealthy is still on the table. you can sing happy birthday to john boehner as much as you want. gwen: he would still say no. >> absolutely. i think it's really premature to tr
's chief negotiating adversary right now, speaker john boehner who was re-elected by house republicans yesterday said they're not ready to accept the president's proposal because it would, quote, hurt our economy and make jobs more difficult. but he also sounded the kumbaya theme. >> now, i do think that the spirit of cooperation that you've seen over the last week, from myself and my team. from democrats across the aisle. from the president. have created an atmosphere where i think that, i remain optimistic. >> folks, there are a lot closer than sometime the bravadoish headlines seem to make clear. this is really about what can boehner take to 50 to 100 house republicans who are willing to temporarily potentially raise some tax rates on some group of wealthier americans? >>> by the way, after $6 billion spent on house senate and presidential campaign, not only did party control not change for the house, senate and white house. but the individual leaders who will begin the negotiations tomorrow, it's the exact group of people. there are some personnel changes but not on that leadership
that siri has to offer me. >> stephanie: i think dictionary.com backs me up on john boehner. >> there are pronunciations i've had to look up. i don't know everything off the top of my head. >> she knows how to pronounce myanmar. >> i know how to use the googles, too. >> stephanie: all right. here she is with all of her fancy, highfalutin words. >> paul ryan lost on the national ticket but won back his seat in congress. he will be back at the table of negotiations continuing over tax increases and spending cuts. paul ryan will continue to head up the house budget committee and john boehner expects him to help as the two parties try to come to a compromise that would stave off the fiscal cliff generate revenue and reduce the deficit. the hope is that ryan can help bring around fellow conservatives. as senator patty murray points out to the "new york times," ryan will have to be willing to listen and compromise if he's going to stick to his former budget proposals, it will be a long winter. americans just vote
standing next to john boehner? >> and mitch mcconnell -- >> and mitch mcconnell by the way. right. >> the president is in a different position now. re-elected by a pretty impressive margin than he was the last time he tried to forge a deal that collapsed. >> right. that was the debt ceiling. he had a real problem with that with the grand bargain. he also had after the 2010 midterms when he had a lame duck session of congress and he had to give on keeping the tax cuts for the wealthy. this is a president right now who believes he's got some leverage. he got re-elected. and these are republicans who are trying to figure out just who they are andy ds sun the president's press conference earlier this week, he's somebody who studied the flaws of a e d i make some progress without overreaching. it's very clear they're worried at the white house about doing some overreach here. if he can get a fiscal deal done, that will be very, very important for his legacy in the long-term. and he knows it. >> are the republicans operating from the same game plan? >> no. i think they're not. i mean,
in washington. to see harry reid and mitch mcconnell and john boehner actually standing together there in the driveway is a very rare feat. and i'm not going to get out there and say happy days are here again. >> okay. what i do want to ask you about, dana, this confederacy of takers article you wrote about how president obama's opponents have come up with a way to avoid the fiscal cliff. there's a large number of patriotic americans mostly from states won by mitt romney who have petitioned the white house to let hem secede. you're saying let them for one big reason. >> well, yes. i'd hate to lose these states because our country has 50 states for a good reason and we like our fellow americans. but strictly as a budgetary matter, if you look at the states that supported mitt rom if i, a lot of those states that want out of the union whether in the south, some in the plains and the mountain states, these are the ones that take far more in federal spending than they give tax dollars. so if you similply lop them off the union we would have a far more prosperous nation. but we'd have
.6 trillion of new revenue. boehner had agreed to $800 billion. it's not hard to find $1.2 trillion as a kind of middle ground to that. then you want to have $4 trillion of total deficit reduction, so that leaves $2.8 trillion of spending reductions that have to happen. here's what people miss. we can avoid going over the cliff with the stroke of a pen. they can just extend all this stuff and kick the can down the road. the real question is are we going to have a big deal? are we going to agree on the major spending restraints that we need as well as the tax stuff in order to actually get the deficit under control? and i think the betting on that is less than 50%. i think we have a great shot at it. but it's going to be really, really hard. >> is that the view from wall street, too? they're not totally confident that this is going to happen? >> what you see in the stock market at the moment is that wall street is not totally confident. that's for sure. >> all right. steve, thanks so much. >> pleasure. >>> coming up, independent senator-elect of maine, angus king joins the conversation. he's a
. >> there is agreement all around that boehner wants a deal. the speaker wants a deal, but he cannot sell a deal, even with the goodwill that he thinks he and the president have on that right now, unless there is real graham ruddman type, real requirements, that these things go in simultaneously. and that's what jim baker wrote about recently, who's had that experience, of fashioning exactly that kind of deal. >> it's important, though, that -- >> you have to cut spending in the future. >> you can raise taxes with one congress. but it takes five congresses to cut spending. >> it's important to keep the focus on growth. not taxes, not spending cuts. you know, the goal here is to get our growth from, you know, one plus percent, up to three and four percent. if we don't get growth going, none of this will matter at all. it's really important as the president frames this that he frames it as growth, and therefore i need this tax increase for these people. this kind of spending cuts here. because it will leverage this kind of growth. >> but that's new spending. that's what the president talks about, john,
and you see speaker boehner clearly wants a deal and, perhaps, has more leverage now with the house republican caucus, but once you get down to the actual negotiations, there are some very tough issues here, a reason this has not been resolved in previous summits. >> that's right but i am optimistic there was a clear mandate, the mandate was for solving our problems. i'm encouraged at no labels.org, an organization that has about 600,000 people, is putting together a group of 40 members of congress evenly split between democrats and republicans who are agreeing to come together as a problem solver's caucus, that the leadership can go to and cut deals on these important problems like the fiscal cliff, education. we have members of congress that recognize that people want them to be problem solvers and work across the aisle. we'll be announcing these 40 members in short order and that represents the kind of mood we're seeing in the shift in congress. >> let me ask you both about mitt romney's post-election comments last wednesday, be in a telephone conference call with donors. many of
when you saw nancy pelosi out there. you saw john boehner out there saying we are hopeful we can get a deal done. and the market had a positive reaction to that. yet it lost that upside throughout the day, teetered back and forth between positive and negative territory. finally, closing the day out positive, so perhaps that suggests that maybe we are a little bit closer. but here's the thing, randi, they've got to get something done. they've got to solve this issue. because if not, the consequences are severe. >> but you listen to some people, and they suggest that fears of fallen off the cliff are overblown. what are the real consequences here? >> the real consequences are another recession. i mean, i can tell you every ceo that i'm talking to right now says i'm not making major decisions. i'm waiting. i'm standing by the sidelines. i can't hire a lot of people, i can't invest in a lot of infrastructure because i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next 45 days. i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next three months. so there's a lot of holdup. now,
is listening to their suggestions. up to this point house speaker john boehner is saying he will not accept any increases on tax rates. but some top republicans are quietly coming around. it is obvious after the election that republicans do not hold the mandate on taxes. while the g.o.p. still might not agree to a tax rate on those making more than $250,000 a year, if democrats demand a millionaire tax increase, it will be hard for republicans to say no. climate change actvilles are not feeling too optimistic after the president's news conference yesterday. advocates had been hoping the president would push for a carbon tax as a way to help raise revenue during talks on the fiscal cliff. while the president did say he is a official believe err -- firm believer in climate change and will take up the issue in the future. for now it will take a backseat to the economy. this is also an issue both parties avoided during the presidential campaign and even during energy talks, there was no mention of climate change
. former lt. governor of new york. and author of decoding the obama health law. john boehner said it is now the law of the land. good to see you. biggest colonel to me, my family and to people out there watching. will my quality of care care change? >> first of all, you may lose the plan you get on your job. and you may lose full-time job status as a result. this law says that employers. >> is this all of it. >> this is all of it. >> we like our guests to bring us cake not 2,000 pages of healthcare legislation. >> unfortunately this is what you have got. this law says that employers with 50 or more full-time workers have to provide health insurance. not just any health insurance but the one size fits all government designed plan. that cost almost twice as much as what many employers currently provide. so, as a result. employers in many cases are going to drop the coverage and may even move their full-time employees into part time status to avoid the penalty. >> we have already seen companies doing that. >> that's right. and the government actually predicts that under this employer mandate,
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)